Original Letter

France

                        December 14th 1917

 

My Dearest Maidie:–

The old lady here told my fortune to-day with the cards and as far as I can make out she told me that I was going to have a change that I was getting leave, that I would soon be with you and that we loved each other intensely and that the best part of our life was to come. Also she gave Turk and Miller and me coffee and generally made herself very popular. Her son has gone to Paris for a special board or some thing like that and she is very triste for it appears that he may have to go back to the Army. She takes a great interest in Turk who can talk to her and she does every thing to keep him from going to the estaminet. But that fortune wasn’t it good Every time I had to cut the cards I had to wish and believe me I nearly made my head ache, I wished so hard for you. I think that it won’t be very long, you know, what with wishing and the fortune as well. It has turned as cold as Canada here after a few days of rain and warmth and we are stoking up to beat the band.

There is, as usual, nothing much in the way of news, even in the newspapers. You have read, of course, of that horrible accident in Halifax. Its bad enough to have a flock of soldiers killed and injured, but after all they are trained up to it, expect it and it doesn’t come as a surprise, but for women and children – its horrible, that’s all. I had always a cold sweat when I would read about the Zeppelins dropping bombs on cities in England just because of the women and children. Well, I’ve had experience now and I have feelings a thousand times stronger than ever before on the subject. War in any case must be the most horrible thing in the world but when it gets anywhere near civilians it is impossible, it should be any way.

But what has all this to do with you and me, Maidie, who I adore? I don’t want to think of anything or any person but you and I seldom do. I never have time to because I have only twenty four hours in each day and that doesn’t give me nearly enough time. I just adore you every minute of my life and even then I can’t love you nearly so much as you deserve. You are the most wonderful lady that ever happened and if I live to be a million I shall never, never understand how you happened to love me. But you did, didn’t you, Sweetheart? I never shall be good enough to be half worthy of you no matter how hard I try – but I like to keep trying. And I want to be taken – right now, and have you love me – with a fierce pour toujours.

            Your own

                        Rackie