Original Letter

                                                            France.

                                                                  7th April, 1918.

 

My Own Maidie:–

It is four o’clock in the afternoon and I have just got back from a good long walk. Dalrymple and I started out at two and we’ve been hiking ever since. Its great to be able to get out in the daytime even if there isn’t anything to be seen but desolation. We walked along an old railway track but the track is only visible in places. The maintaining crew will surely scratch their heads when they are turned loose on that bit of railway. Things have been thrown on that right of way that didn’t come out of the train window. I didn’t see any Land & Waters neatly folded either. Ferris, you’d do anything once, wouldn’t you? It’s great being able to get out during the day and now that Turkey is back its quite practicable as there are two of us on the job daily. Fresh air tastes mighty good after a few hours in a dugout although the one we are in now isn’t as bad as some. At the same time there are occasions when a dugout is not to be despised. Open brackets, I haven’t seen them yet close brackets and knock wood. He knocks wood.

Apart from the walk nothing very interesting, nothing amusing has happened to-day. I am getting like the soldier who when asked the date said “I don’t know. All I know is that it gets light and then after a while it gets dark again”. I think there are quite a lot of chaps feel just that way about it. Personally I think its a fascinating business if it weren’t fatal in so many cases. My chiefest kick against it is that leave isn’t common enough. I’m holding out for weekends and long leave every three months. In time of course it will come to that but they are only getting it organised now. If leave had not stopped when it did I am quite sure that in two or three months it would have been coming around every five months. One leave train from France pulled into Victoria Station and the men never got off. An engine was hitched on the other end and back they went with the best of luck. We had two men on that train and what they have to say about their luck is shocking. But I think that it will open up again in a few weeks. Its got to. Anyway it must be open by July for I have an engagement for the 25th of that month which I am going to keep if I have to cheat. And right now I cannot for the life of me see how I can manage to possess my soul in patience until July. Its three months and eighteen days and – even the eighteen days – well its far too long. Its too bad, Dear, that you are yoked with a man you see only twice a year – and some years not so often. It must make you sick often when you think that you might be settled down and living comfortably at home in Canada instead of rambling around Europe – what d’ya mean rambling? Honest, though Dear, doesn’t it feed you?

Sweetheart, take me in your arms and hold me so tightly that I can’t speak, it must be very, very tight though, otherwise I shall be telling you that I love you to-day so much that I ache with it. I want you, my own, want you more each day, you are all the world to me, Sweetheart.

                                                            Your own

                                                                  Ross

Photographs

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